MST Audio supporting Red Cross Japan with proceeds from Red Tide sales

I’ve been following #Japan on Twitter since the horrible earthquake and corollary tsunami last week. Among the myriad voices, the Japanese audiophile community has been rallying support. MST Audio, maker of the fabulous FiQuest headphone amp, will be donating 32% of the proceeds from their new, limited edition Red Tide interconnect cable, to the Japan Red Cross. Red Tide uses 15cm long CV4.2 cabling from AudioQuest and will hook up your iPhone/DAC to a headphone/car/home amp. Red tide will cost 95$ of which, 30$ will be donated to the Red Cross. Cables should be ready to ship out one in April. Since many of Japan’s supplies are constrained after the devastation, only 50 of MST’s Red Tide will be made. Shipping information is as follows:

Via EMS
ASIA:$12; Oceania and Northern America:$15; Europe:$18; Southern America and Africa: $20

Via first class international
ASIA, Guam & Saipan:$4.5; Oceania, North America & Europe:$5.5; South America and Africa: $6.5

Purchasing will be handled through MST’s sales account: sales@m-s-tech.jp

MST Audio are located in Tokyo and have seen first hand the devastation wrecked by the earthquakes and tsunami. They’re a nice bunch of lads who have their ears on one thing: audio perfection, and their hearts in the right place. Thank you MST!

NOTE: Watch this post for information on where to sign up for Red Tide.

Gaming WWIII – Japan VS USA

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Yomiuri Newspaper reckons that in gaming’s kingdom (Japan), hitherto successful gaming companies are losing ground in marketplace to the iPod touch. Both Nintendo and Sony have strong hardware and competitive software libraries, but their hegemony is threatened because of punctual price cuts and yearly hardware upgrades to Apple’s iDevice. The platform’s game library of ~20 000 titles — a number which is nearly 3x the combined total of titles available between the PSP and NDS — is one of the best pieces of evidence of its success. The real killer, however, is that Apple’s software distribution method has had a year of success and looks to only be growing.

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Ninja’s VS pirates: Japanese mobile users to walk plank

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The Japanese mobile phone market is incredible. If the iPhone hasn’t picked up steam in the island nation, it is probably for good reason: it simply doesn’t do half of the ‘mobile internet things‘ it needs to in order to be useful in Japan. One, is piracy. Apple’s sandboxed OS is great for stopping malicious code, and may even be the best way for porn connoisseurs to finally escape the viral effects of their habit. But, it isn’t a great platform for getting free music; especially in the land of the rising sun.

According to the Japanese newspaper, Yomiuri, certain BBS services and webpages are loaded with tunes for mobile phone users to capitalise on without having to part with any capital.

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Apple Giveth and Apple Taketh Away Again – OS 3.0 comes and goes for Japanese iPods

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Appbank’s blog noted that 3.0 was available for download earlier today which was promptly eaten up by its administrator for 1200円. After paying out the goodly amount and updating, however, the iPod Touch remained with version 2.2. This is not an isolated report. At least three people at Appbank received news that 3.0 had debuted. After downloading however, their iPods also showed that 2.2, not 3.0 was installed.

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iPhone Art: PC Dr. Momo

Cute and Helpful:  Momo

Cute and Helpful: Momo

Project Momo have broken their first ground in the App Store with PC Dr. Momo.  That is not ‘PC’ Politically Correct’ or President’s Choice’.  It probably stands for PeeCee or PC or Personal Computer.  Dr., meanwhile is probably short for doctor – and momo?  I should have asked. Anyway, PC Dr. Momo rides a fine line between dross and distinction.  It is not a game nor is it really a reader app.  It is a reading app tech demo with the potential that could launch a genre.  However, it has a long long way to go before it reaches the popularity it needs to pull the purse strings of App Store shoppers.

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