Watch Flash Videos on your iPhone with SkyFire Mobile Browser [Video]

Running Flash content on your iDevice isn’t new. We’ve seen it in the form of Frash, though you’ll need a jailbroken iPhone and it’s far from perfect. But what about a simple (and legit) solution for watching Flash videos on your iPhone? Well according to CNNMoney, this soon will become a reality as Apple has finally approved the Mobile Browser app SkyFire, which will make its grand appearance on the App Store this Thursday at 9AM EST for the price of $2.99.

Already a popular app on the Android platform, SkyFire is able detect and convert Flash videos into HTML 5 on SkyFire’s servers. As this process is happening on the fly, users will then be able to watch these videos that were previously unavailable to the iPhone/iPod Touch. Unfortunately, SkyFire won’t let you play with Flash games, or non-video Flash content, but it’s still a great start for users who’ve been starving for Flash on the platform. Check out the demo video of the app in action after the gap.

Update: SkyFire arrived a bit earlier than expected and is now live on the App Store!

Skyfire Web Browser Skyfire Labs, Skyfire Web Browser, 2.5MB – $2.99

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It’s time to Frash your iPhone 4 (tutorial included)

Probably the most advertised “flaw” of the iPhone is, of course, Flash (or lack thereof). Well, at least until the recent Antennagate :) Anyhow, after the whole Apple vs Adobe saga over the last year or so, one would be safe to assume that hell will freeze over before the infamously resource-hungry platform finds it’s way onto the iOS. Well, it seems it’s time for the Devil to start shopping for a new pair of wooly underwear because Comex, the developer responsible for the most recent iDevice jailbreak, has just updated Frash – the port of the Android flash player for the iOS.

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Memory usage: Flash VS Safari

Flash 10.1 using more memory than Safari

A picture is worth a thousand blog posts. I have no love for Adobe’s Flash -for any plug-in that uses more memory than the web browser it “plugs” already. It’s 2010. We’ve no need for dinky, proprietary plug ins maintained by insular software houses. Part of me thinks industry standards, too, are complete wastes of time and effort, but that’s another 話.

Flash doesn’t belong in mobile phones or tablet computers. And for months, I’ve had the oily inkling that Flash 10 doesn’t belong in desktop computers.

Adobe, 1999 called and wants its plug in back.

More options for getting Flash on the iOS

With all of the Apple vs Adobe “friendly” exchanges these last few months, it’s virtually a certainty Flash will never find a true home on the iOS. Or will it? More and more developers are taking upon themselves to offer solutions to have at least some way of having the heavily sought technology on your iDevice. We have already reported Cloud Browse – a virtual browser on a remote server, streamed right to your iPhone and Smokescreen – a Javascript Flash recompiler. And just recently two more projects have surfaced on the web.

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Adobe: Flash, it’s Apple’s issue

If Apple and Google are having it out, Adobe and Apple, who have had rough hits regarding Adobe’s proprietary Flahs, are having it out too. Steve Jobs (cue heavenly fanfare) has said Adobe’s software isn’t stable on OSX, but now Adobe are at Apple’s neck, saying it is an Apple problem. When will this silliness ever end? According to Zdnet, Adobe’s CEO, Shantanu Narayen, has this to say of the situation:

“We’ve been fairly transparent,” said Narayen. “We’re committed to bringing flash to any platform with a screen. This has nothing to do with technology. It’s an apple issue and you’ll have to check in with them.”

More Flash goodness/badness after the gap:

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Microsoft on standards and interoperability – Silverlight install prompted

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Quite classic really: Microsoft have uploaded a video of IE developer, Dean Hachamovitch, explaining the team’s strides in preparing IE9 for public release. The focus? Standards and interoperability. The crux of the joke is that Silverlight is Microsoft’s proprietary answer to Adobe Flash; and in order to watch the video, you must download compatibility component for Silverlight.

Still interested? Click here for the non-proprietary version (dubbed “PSP” MP4).

Thanks John Gruber.

Hungry Apple’s chip habit – RAMppetite

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The jump from 32GB to 64GB in the newer iPod touch models means more than just a new-found ability to squeeze the rest of your audio library into the palm of your hand. It means that some poor sod from pathetically nourished countries like American, China, Germany, and Japan will have to go without – flash memory that is. Even the world’s biggest electronics company whose GDP outweighs the country of Argentina is carefully counting its chips. Samsung will be shipping fewer memory modules to non-Apple companies in the coming months, and in anticipation of the China Unicom/Apple deal which will bring the iPhone to China, Apple are sure to be more voracious than ever.

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The Importance of the “Mobile Internet” – A Lesson Learned Through David Thorne’s Joke Mails

news-rss-realinternet-vs-real-mobile A large percentage of tech sites feature RSS feeds. Even your friendly TouchMyApps staff have put together a subscription system so that you never have to browse our site at all unless really bored. Well, I woke this morning with an email in my mail box from a trusted site’s RSS feed which led me to an article over at the Sun. Usually, I stay away from publications that begin and end in the same syllable, but today I couldn’t get back into sleep and, not wanting to wake my wife, I read on.

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Many of you have read the Spider email that made rounds a little over half a year ago. The culprit, a person by the name of David Thorne is at it again with mixed, but good results. His first joke is rather duff, but, David flourishes his humour in top form as the page scrolls south.

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