White Park Bay’s Oxford Reference Series in Review – The devil is in the details

White Park Bay recently released a handful of new Oxford Reference Dictionaries to add to its already strong suite. The new dictionaries feature a few upgrades to the Oxford Reference series I reviewed before. These include: better mail integration and indexing as well as a structured note-taking system. For 14.99$, they remain a little pricey, but are great titles for the would-be know-it-all.

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WordBook English Dictionary & Thesaurus in Review – A Perfect Dictionary for a Heavenly Price

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I am very particular about my reference materials. Perhaps it was hammered into me in university when every course’s materials list was replete with nothing less than the Oxford Dictionary of English. Thus, when our Dictionary review section was finally launched, I was shocked at the proliferation of non-Oxford references in the App Store of which WordBook is one. At first, I took little notice of it as I was more anxious to complete reviews of THE Dictionary.

Looking back, my decision was not unfounded. WordBook, though not mated to Oxford’s content, is perhaps the most impressive cost-effective reference at the App Store. My tongue-wagging review won’t do greater justice than simply saying: ‘Kiss It’. Had I completed this review first, it would be much harder to recommend even the Enfour masterpieces.

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Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus in Review – What was that word again?

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A thesaurus is an indispensable tool for writers of any level. Verbose people (yours truly) need them and even more eloquent writers like Crom and Young can benefit from their use. The Oxford American Writer’s Thesaurus is an excellent reference tool for anyone who is looking for that … word. In previous reviews, we looked at the Roget’s Thesaurus, AHD4 Deluxe and a couple of Oxford dictionaries that also feature thesaurus fuctions.

American Writer’s Thesaurus has a unique take on thesaurus in that it is tailored to writers. Just so you know, if you are writing anything: blogs, letters, papers, books, articles – anything at all – you are a writer. You don’t have to be published or famous or elegant. This thesaurus product is helpful for anyone who puts their words and thoughts down onto some form of media.

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QuickOffice – A Brief Look and a Quick, “Finally”

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Dictionaries? Covered. Wikipedia? Getting there. The App Store even has Bibles now and entire Bible libraries, but its list of productivity and reference apps is far from complete. QuickOffice have brought forth an iPhone iteration of their popular mobile software which is specifically tweaked for the iPhone and iPod Touch. My wife and I tend to spend a goodly amount of time pouring over excel files both for her work and for our finances and I am a slowly doctoring myself into a Word junkie. I have been fortunate enough to use it now for about two weeks and feel that my experience with it is enough to finish an in-depth review. Look for that on Monday.

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Enfour’s Oxford Deluxe in Review: Redefining ‘The Best’

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Though there are many concise versions of the Oxford English Dictionary, only a couple versions of the Oxford Dictionary of English have hit the shelves of the App Store. Likewise, our Oxford reviews have focused on the many flavours of the Concise versions. This week however, we sample the taste and culmination of research, programming and foresight that Enfour have employed to bring the entire ODE & OTE Oxford to the App Store.

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Prelude Mobile’s Concise Oxford English Dictionary in Review

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Prelude Mobile released an aesthetically pleasing and no frills Concise Oxford English Dictionary at a pivotal pricepoint of 19.99$. While cheaper than its competitors, Prelude’s version is remarkably simple to use and fast enough for those who want a dictionary and nothing more. The pertinent question for Prelude is, how far can a simple interface go against the bigger and more ambitious projects by Mobile Systems, Paragon and Enfour?

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Paragon Software Group’s Concise Oxford English Dictionary in Review

paragon-coed-icon1Paragon Software Group also have a version of The Concise Oxford English Dictionary. At 24.99$, it is cheaper than Mobile System’s Dictionary and Thesaurus combination and offers digitised audio and a faster interface than their competitor. However, have Paragon brought enough bells, whistles and gadgets to the table to really compete with their more expensive rival?

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Oxford English Dictionaries in Review – Digitising the Leader

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The Oxford English Dictionary, the only English lexicon worthy of the definite article, has several iterations in the App Store for hungry stodgy customers. By hungry, I mean that the App Store’s reference niche, though small, is rabid. Many users want the best, not just the most popular new entry. Last week, we looked at the excellent American Heritage Dictionary Fourth Edition that offers a complete dictionary/thesaurus package for the handheld digital age and this week our review will turn to the OED.

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WeDict Pro in Review – No More Freebies

wedictpro1There was once a time when WeDict was a half-decent free dictionary. It sufficed for the basic needs of many people who deemed literacy a high priority in their lives. Between that time and now, the freebie faded away and WeDict Pro, the full paid version, remained. While more robust in functions and features than its free predecessor, does WeDict Pro have enough to justify its (as many would consider) hefty price?

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