Bobble Rep – heads to the App Store

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Bobble Rep 111th Congress Edition is back in the news, and this time because of a reversal. No, the Republicans didn’t storm the Oval Office and install George Bush’s son as acting governor of the union (got that?). Rather, Apple switched the Windows Vista disallow button off, allowing Bobble Rep 111th Congress Edition to be sold at the App Store. Allegedly, it ridiculed public figures, an act which Apple -a company very much in the public eye- evidently abhor. In TMA’s previous article, I pointed out that there are numerous soundboards (not to mention cartoon figures of many very public people around the world) which should also be removed on the same grounds. Apple received a goodly amount of flack for this boner of a decision.

Thanks to everyone who showed support for the dev and artists involved in getting a creatively democratic app to the App Store. Artist Tom Richmond and RG Entertainment are probably having a laugh now due to heaps more press than they would have had Apple not censored the App. Perhaps this is another ChiFFaN conspiracy?

RG Entertainment Ltd., Bobble Rep – 111th Congress Edition, 0.99$, 19.2 MB
Bobble Rep - 111th Congress Edition

Bobble Rep 111th Congress Edition madly rejected by Apple

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Forget about Bobble Rep (an app illustrated by Tom Richmond) which should have been a fun, unique, new way for Americans to contact their government representatives. The app, which listed contact information for members of Congress has been rejected. Not because it might cause the iPhone to explode (even Apple figured out that this ain’t a terrorist app); not because citizens might contact their government – no. It is because, according to Apple’s approval guidelines, section 3.3.14 insinuates that the app ridicules public figures. Public figures – not even heads of state; not government ministers, public figures. There are a lot of public figures out there in the world – let’s see if Apple are ready to support such bland band-aid dogmas.

Rejection letter and article continued after the gap:

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