Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit – audio, video, AND photos

Thanks to Apple’s reticence to include USB ports or memory card slots in the iPad, THIS is making news.

The Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit, which has just gone on sale for an even 29$, makes brilliant use of the iPad’s number 1 feature: mobile OSX. The operating system isn’t just a touch-friendly app-mongering front end, it supports low-level instructions as well. Specifically, the iPad Camera Connection Kit can connect to USB audio and professional interfaces.

Continue reading…

iPad – roots in audiophile, but is the force strong in this one?

The iPad is only one vowel from the mother of modern multimedia, the iPod. Tweets about iPad and music keep popping up, audio company executives keep pestering me to get one, and otherwise, I’m curious; there has to be something in the convenience of a device 4x the size of an iPod touch. Who knows, the iPad could be as dirty sounding as its nomenclature, but it could well be the next mono-speaker-toting-boombox! It’s Apple’s baby, so expect it to work with headsets and the best earphones/headphones out there, not to mention the rich boneyard of audio accessories such as line out docks and microphones. In 2005, Apple dog-eared a new page: they brought in gapless playback with the iPod 5G. Then, in 2007, they dropped DRM-crippled iTunes music, and in 2008, their iPod line went audiophile with excellent earphone performance reminiscent of the original iPod shuffle, but without all the hiss. No other company has come so far and done so much for portable audio quality while keeping their big mouths shut about all their achievements. Everyone else trumpets typical dross: advanced engine sound FFX13/dual DAC/340 decibels signal to noise ratio/Class A.

Inquisitive rant continued after the gap:

Continue reading…

MEElectronics M11 inner earphone in Review – King of the MEEl!

Cheesy title aside, the M11 really is the king of MEElectronics’ earphone line up. Luxurious in your choice of 2 turned aluminium colours, it hits its price point pointedly, if more politely than the skull-splitting lance which felled King Henry II. For the budget-conscious upgrader, its modest 39.99$ price tag scintillates royalty, and like most of MEEl’s line, is tough, made to last even the most organised of coups at the hands of its careless market.

Continue reading…

Why iSheep are better than LemmingS

Apple are evil. Apple suck. Apple make rubbish sh*t. They can’t research. They can’t build. And most of all, they can’t make good-sounding devices. That is because they rely on a stupid, baa baa customer base of fools whose brains are mush, whose limbs are mutton, and who walk on cloven feet. Apple cater to iSheep, the brand of humanoid who buys up any new crap from Apple, just because it is an Apple product. And iSheep deserve nothing less than contempt, or better yet: the lynch mob.

Urban Dictionary has a good pragmatic use of the word, ‘iSheep’.

Person 1: “Look at Kate with her new iPod nano.”

Person 2: “But she only just got a new iPod a few months ago.”

Person 1: “But now the iPod nano is the newest thing, so that old iPod is obsolete!”

Person 2: “What an iSheep.”

But, if iSheep suck, LemmingS (Sansa Lemmings) are worse: their bowels are moved sick by Apple, spraying out shi*ty lies, succumbing to hate-based marketing, and worst of all – shunning the use of their brains in order to belong to an elitist niche.

Continue reading…

Monster Turbine Pro Gold earphones in Review – It’s time to Par-Tay!

2009’s party, mixed by last year’s Monster Turbine earphone, was off the charts. But in 2010, Monster’s sophomore Turbine, the Turbine Pro Gold, does everything better. Everything the original Turbine did right: bass, mids, treble – is trumped, and each is more controlled, more readily adapted for any music you throw at it. The Turbine Pro proves that Monster are ready to pick up the cheque as the best high-volume dynamic inner earphone maker on the planet. If you’d like to discuss the Monster Turbine Pro Gold, head to our forums.

Continue reading…

Graham Slee Voyager headphone amp in Review – plastic surgery done right

As HiFi headphone listening evolves, so does its component base. Chic design has influenced many market heavyweights – even boutique audio companies have opted to create sexy. But whereas amps like the ALO Rx is a masterpiece of steam and industry, the Graham Slee Voyager is plastic and comparatively bulky. Thankfully, looks are deceiving. This amp really takes off, surpassing all of my expectations.

Update: Feel free to discuss about the Graham Slee Voyager in our forums

Continue reading…

Impressions of the Final Audio Design FI-DC1601SS inner earphone – cold hard steel

Like stealing the king’s ransom, reviewing arguably the world’s best earphone is no easy task. Final Audio Design is no ordinary name in hi-end audio; its staple audio system have been hailed as among the best in the world, clear and true on the other; but overall, they are certainly pricey. Their new earphone products are marvels of esoterica: just like their speakers, they produced in small quantities with one aim in mind: mind-blowing sound. Of course, Final Audio’s top earphone range, the 1601, is made for the choicest of audiophiles. The same company produces the Opus 204 speaker system which not only costs 500 thousand dollars, but by merit of its solid steel chassis, weighs 800 kilograms per channel! In the same vein, the solid steel FI-DC1601SS is heavy and expensive, but ultimately, wonderful.

Continue reading…

MEElectronics R1 inner earphone in Review – all wood, all the time

MEElectronics’ earphones rode onto the scene last year with aplomb. Not only are they priced to sell, they sound good and in general, are made well. Now, MEEl have jumped on the wood bandwagon started by the venerable Victor FX500. The R-1 is a solid earphone which will rock the clocks of bass lovers who happen to have no more than 40$ in the bank.

Continue reading…

Final Audio Design – the final word on high end earphones

Final Audio Design’s earphones say hi-end better than any headphone product. They are built from the ground up to deliver perfect sound rather than convenience. To accomplish this, Final Audio employ a special metal alloy on the earphone’s inner sound chamber which eliminates distracting vibrations. Equally as important is the regularisation of air pressure on both sides of the speaker. Both earphones are things of audio beauty, but as we will see, are as audiophile esoteric as high-end power supplies. The all-steel FI-DC1601SS tips the scale at just above 800$ US, while the FI-DC1350M2 checks in nearer 250$. Their top model, the FI-DC1601SC costs more than 2000$. But contrary to most expensive earphones, Final Audio Designs’ products strike impressive balance of sound quality rather than diamond dust.

Please take a look at Final Audio Design’s earphone webpage (Japanese) for more information and stay tuned for our in-depth article.

Audio Technica CK100 inner earphones in Review – TitaniYUM!

With the release of the CK100, Audio Technica have reinvented the inner earphone. Their former flagship portable, the dual-driver CK10 is a thing of neutral, fast, and airy beauty. But no matter how good it is, its younger, pricier sibling hurdles it in every imaginable way. The CK100 houses 3 balanced armature speakers per earphone from which a brilliant atmospheric sound haunts. For audiophiles looking for a high-quality, good-sounding inner earphone, there is none better for the price.

Continue reading…