TouchMyApps » LG http://www.touchmyapps.com All Things iPhone and iPad for those who like to Touch. iOS App reviews, News, New Apps, Price Drops and App Gone Free Mon, 14 Apr 2014 11:45:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.7.3 Better than iPad: LG’s amazing tablet computer will be http://www.touchmyapps.com/2010/08/20/better-than-ipad-lgs-amazing-tablet-computer-will-be/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2010/08/20/better-than-ipad-lgs-amazing-tablet-computer-will-be/#comments Sat, 21 Aug 2010 02:35:04 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=38050 If anyone – anyone at all – can better Apple at building devices that people want to use, it is LG, the South Korean electronics giant, who more and more, prove themselves up to the task. LG are innovative. They are full of clever designers. When I sat with them in an informal Q&A last … Read more]]>

a leaked picture of LG's amazing iPad killer

If anyone – anyone at all – can better Apple at building devices that people want to use, it is LG, the South Korean electronics giant, who more and more, prove themselves up to the task. LG are innovative. They are full of clever designers. When I sat with them in an informal Q&A last year about upcoming iPhone-killer smart phones, it was obvious they ‘got it’. The problem I see with the iPad is that it is just so ungraceful; you can’t type on it, you can’t create on it – you can’t do aught but consume media. That is the iPad’s problem. Android will fix all that and LG will magically wave the form factor away. Combined with Android’s wealth of productivity , its smooth, fragmentation-free hardware glut, and its simplicity will show Apple who is boss – that is, if LG can help them out.

If you’ve ever owned an LG phone, or read through an LG manual; if you’ve enjoyed their incredible style and poise in the marketplace, you know what I’m talking about. LG, if anyone can better than iPad, it is you, the Yoda of electronics.

^^ sic ^^

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Average Selling Price: iPhone worth 8 Nokia or 2 Blackberry phones http://www.touchmyapps.com/2010/08/11/average-selling-price-iphone-worth-8-nokia-or-2-blackberry-phones/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2010/08/11/average-selling-price-iphone-worth-8-nokia-or-2-blackberry-phones/#comments Wed, 11 Aug 2010 13:47:12 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=37518 The ever-resourceful @DaringFireball got me onto a clever fellow by the name of Horace Dediu who runs asymco, a quirky but engaging mobile-focused blog. He does a lot of his own research, loads his site with great articles, and gets clicks. This one just happens to be his research on the average selling price (ASP) of … Read more]]>

The iPhone's ASP nearly totals the competition

The ever-resourceful @DaringFireball got me onto a clever fellow by the name of Horace Dediu who runs asymco, a quirky but engaging mobile-focused blog. He does a lot of his own research, loads his site with great articles, and gets clicks. This one just happens to be his research on the average selling price (ASP) of  mobile phone competitors: Nokia, Apple, LG, Samsung, Motorola, Sony Ericcson, and RIM. The results are sour grapes for most of the companies; only Apple and RIM come away without looking foolish.

More after the gap:

Of course, all this comes on the cusp of Android VS iPhone sales, market dominance, and app stipends. A lot of the phones represented in asymco’s graphs run dime-a-dozen OS’es. Apple and Blackberry are indeed doing well; their products don’t drag down the bottom line. The reason? They run their own successful proprietary operating systems. They don’t have to compete with every other ‘me too’ manufacturer who one-up’s the competition by adding a rubber back and a new icon.

Of course, RIM are in trouble, but they’ve been able to ride the wave of success this long because they offer a unique product that competes on its own terms, not on the terms dictated by scratchy, ubiquitous OS’es the likes of which Google and Microsoft like to trumpet. While peons like us wet our panties talking about sales, there is nothing at all sexy about the best selling anything. Quality speaks for itself and ASP is one indication of quality.

Thank you asymco.

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SKT: keeping it Hancool – Korean iPhone no go? http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/11/13/skt-keeping-it-hancool-korean-iphone-no-go/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/11/13/skt-keeping-it-hancool-korean-iphone-no-go/#comments Fri, 13 Nov 2009 08:02:45 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=23035 As I mentioned before, neither LG nor Samsung have a clue how to design mobile phones, but the ever fickle SKT are harbouring thoughts of cranking out Android products from either company rather than selling Apple’s iPhone. On the one hand, Android is a very good platform which I respect; it would make little sense … Read more]]>

News-Korea-SKTnoiPhone

As I mentioned before, neither LG nor Samsung have a clue how to design mobile phones, but the ever fickle SKT are harbouring thoughts of cranking out Android products from either company rather than selling Apple’s iPhone. On the one hand, Android is a very good platform which I respect; it would make little sense for SKT to pass up the business opportunity afforded by the clever OS. But on the other hand, in serving an LG or Samsung Android, the telecom mogul will only further entrench itself in the quagmire of a stodgy Korean-only oligarchy.

But, it isn’t really about SKT or rival KT (who will bring the iPhone to market… sometime). In a recent Korea Times article, SKT’s CEO, Jung Man-won, makes several valid points including the fact that in order to carry the iPhone, a company has to share revenues with Apple. And due to its open-source mobile OS, Google’s stipend is much lower per Android device than competitor’s phones. But that doesn’t explain Korea’s cold-shoulder politics despite the iPhone’s overwhelming success in neighbouring markets.

Though cut off from the north by a difficult brother and surrounded on all other sides by the sea, South Korea is not an island – especially in its expanding online community. This nation is booming in the IT sector and in Seoul alone, Silicon Valley-esque ghettos rise and fall yearly. Its consumers are savvy, making researched decisions and while many choose Korean PMP’s such as Cowon and iRiver, the iPod touch is the best-selling all-in-one device in Korea despite carrying a 50% premium.

Still, SKT are falling into the acquiescent camp of companies who will not challenge the status quo. Simply put, electronic sales in Korea are not governed by a free-market economy. With fingers in every business including selling groceries and making cars, Samsung and LG will not let another player in unless Korean companies pay dearly.

For developers too, SKT’s decision to go Android is wishy-washy. Android will boom – there is no doubt about it. It is portable, cheap, and to cash-strapped software houses, a great first step. And, hedged into the security and fastidiousness of an open-source community, Android is a great way to fuel the spread of ideas. In spite of those advantages, SKT’s choice of Samsung and/or LG will only prolong one of the most insular handphone markets in the world which has led to the Korean market being strangle-holded by flashy, do-nothing phones. The Korean handphone market is in a rut.

In the end, SKT will keep things in its own back yard while playing the ambivalent sampler. While Android is a good place to start, diversifying a business is also important. Mr. Jung quotes dismal iPhone figures in China, but what he fails to mention is the gouging prices Chinese vendors charge in a country where wages are lower. Korea is not China nor Japan, nor is it the West. But while Samsung and SKT expound the merits of the open source Android, they conspire to lock up the home market, battening the hatches with partisan politics.

Mr. Jung’s equivoque,”Personally, I am doubting the iPhone’s success in Korea” says less about the the iPhone’s potential in the Korean market than it does about Korea’s aversion to change.

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Korean Smartphones to accompany iPhone in Korea? http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/10/07/korean-smartphones-to-accompany-iphone-in-korea/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/10/07/korean-smartphones-to-accompany-iphone-in-korea/#comments Wed, 07 Oct 2009 08:10:52 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=21121 When the iPhone comes to these shores in November, it will bring a lot of extra baggage with it. In truth, it is only one of a handful of smart phones which will debut in Korea – a category of phones that may have trouble taking off. Obvious restrictions on data, packages, and other general … Read more]]>

news-korea-kt-iphone

When the iPhone comes to these shores in November, it will bring a lot of extra baggage with it. In truth, it is only one of a handful of smart phones which will debut in Korea – a category of phones that may have trouble taking off. Obvious restrictions on data, packages, and other general internet tom-foolery have kept such devices at a wary distance from the tech-savvy nation, but all of that may soon change – in fact, it must.

Though Samsung hog 51% of the market, all of their smart phones have been released abroad, ostensibly to test the waters, and foreign appetite for their designs. The same is true for Korea’s number 2 manufacturer: LG. Both companies’ domestic phone offering rely on screens, TV, and cute models to sell their phones do little else besides TV and telephony.

According to the Joong Ang Daily, November should also bring Korean smart phones along with international counterparts to the newly-opened handset market. But, like the sudden and ineffectual injection of pretty-boy David Beckham to America’s Major League Soccer, it won’t affect the fact that Koreans have yet to use real smartphones, iPhone or not. Adoption of the new handhelds may be difficult simply because the computer-esque features which many iPhone users hold dear, aren’t really seen on any Korean handset.

Some smartphones pack the latest screens and cameras, but most rely on the amalgamation of communication-based technology. The iPhone is an all-rounder: it plays video, has a decent, but not great screen; it can make calls, but isn’t the best mobile phone – aside from its elegantly simple interface, it is best known for the App Store. In Korea though, the App Store hasn’t picked up as well as its counterparts in the West have. It will need to grow domestically in order to be successful.

Fortunately, Korea houses an extremely talented and dedicated gang of software engineers whose vanguard of mobile applications should pave the way for the iPhone. And not only the iPhone – Android, a platform whose ranks burst with everything from mobile phones to netbooks, and digital players, will finally land here. For Korean customers’ sake, international smartphones must break in, if only to sharpen the monotonous market.

If you found this article interesting, feel free to read more about iPhone developments in Korea.
Clone Wars – LG’s last hopeiPhone VS Goliath in stagnant Korean marketKorean Wireless fees to tumble 20%South Korean iPhone: the last Shackle undone?Samsung to open Me-Too App Store

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The iClone Wars – LG’s last hope http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/10/05/the-iclone-wars-lgs-last-hope/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/10/05/the-iclone-wars-lgs-last-hope/#comments Mon, 05 Oct 2009 08:12:04 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=21008 Recently, I had the opportunity to see what LG were up to in the mobile phone arena. It was a small event — just a survey — where LG ran slides and concepts by a group of 12 hungry techies and asked for feedback which took the form of a ~35-page evaluation booklet. The electronics … Read more]]>

News-LGiPhone

Recently, I had the opportunity to see what LG were up to in the mobile phone arena. It was a small event — just a survey — where LG ran slides and concepts by a group of 12 hungry techies and asked for feedback which took the form of a ~35-page evaluation booklet. The electronics giant is planning to release a hi-tech touch-screen phone which ostensibly could come to market in 1-2 years. As the number 3 mobile phone manufacturer in the world, LG have made more cheap plastic phones than Ford made cheap, black, metal cars. But, unlike Ford, whose innovation was the industrious factory line which brought the automobile to the masses, LG already have mastered the art of cheap and tasteless. Their next phone will seek to tackle a new concern: usability and viability in the world marketplace.

The presentation marched through about 17 concepts which ranged from multi touch input to selective screen lighting and a unique protective case which rendered tactile buttons, images, and other GUI elements on a protective film. LG are no stranger to hardware innovation.

But, after 2 hours, infinite questions, and some a few face palms, I was convinced that the mobile giant are aimlessly attaching a market which they don’t understand. Here’s why:

LG are behind the curve. Their number 3 position is founded on cheap, useless phones which accompany cheap contracts. Nevertheless, they reckon that innovative engineering can place them in a strong place in the market. According to them, users want innovative touch input, security, and better battery life. In the ~35 demo slides, the LG rep compared the company’s brainstormed ideas to the iPhone, and in about 10% of the cases, bettered it by offering unique security and/or phone interaction methods. But largely, the company are simply trying to reinvent the wheel; no amount of hardware innovation can aid the giant’s touch phone in direct comparison to other manufacturers.

Secondly, LG are thinking of the future. In November, the Korean market will be open to foreign smart phones, all of which are better than any domestic rival. Samsung and LG, among large mobile manufacturers have sat on their collective duffs more than any of their rivals, largely because of domestic monopoly and reliance on market dominance, rather than their customers, to drive demand of their products. Their new touch phone will primarily be marketed toward Europe and North America, a market which has been bolstered by strong competition. LG will pull any sellable feature from RIM, Apple, and other manufacturers to market a phone, which above all, is a freakish concoction of hardware and software features.

Thirdly, at the end of the survey, all people were asked to compare which GUI interaction method they thought best. To make a short story long, the majority preferred the iPhone method to any of LG’s brainstormed ideas. LG demonstrated 6 or 7 input methods, all of which were based on different navigation methods, most of which were based on some hodgepodge of multi touch. The firm have put heads together to come up with something, anything which will be able to compete. However, they have no plan for congruent interaction. Imagine a nice new plastic LG phone – the gPhone – which has a hi-tech raised-texture screen to help the user interact like they would on a regular keypad-based smart phone: great. But, all gestures and interactions are based on different input methods. Two-finger scrolling for web pages, jog dial contact selection, multi-touch navigation of maps; not to mention many other incongruent designs, LG’s designs for user interaction make no sense; there isn’t a single, binding user interaction design.

If LG, and other ‘me too’ manufacturers continue to grasp at straws, brainstorming devices which purport success by tacking features onto features, their products will be forgotten. Korean phone mobile manufacturers must not apply domestic car design to their phones: the more they copy and paste rather than create, their cloned products, services, and customers, will die. It isn’t being number 3, but LG have their cloned fingers on the triggers, gunning for anything and everything that seems a good idea.

That said, I’m still in for the LG Watch Phone.

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