TouchMyApps » Camera http://www.touchmyapps.com All Things iPhone and iPad for those who like to Touch. iOS App reviews, News, New Apps, Price Drops and App Gone Free Fri, 12 Sep 2014 16:31:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.7.4 Snappgrip turns your iPhone into a point and shoot camera http://www.touchmyapps.com/2012/12/19/snappgrip-turns-your-iphone-into-a-real-point-and-shoot-camera/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2012/12/19/snappgrip-turns-your-iphone-into-a-real-point-and-shoot-camera/#comments Wed, 19 Dec 2012 22:26:59 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=71455 The Gizmon iCa iPhone camera case is downright awesome. But what if you want a more hefty grip so that your iPhone literally feels more like a real digital point and shoot camera? Enter the Snappgrip, a cool bluetooth enabled case/controller that just started its Kickstarter campaign moments ago. snappgrip provides camera controls for smartphones. The snappgrip controller mounts … Read more]]>

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The Gizmon iCa iPhone camera case is downright awesome. But what if you want a more hefty grip so that your iPhone literally feels more like a real digital point and shoot camera? Enter the Snappgrip, a cool bluetooth enabled case/controller that just started its Kickstarter campaign moments ago.

snappgrip provides camera controls for smartphones. The snappgrip controller mounts to a protective phone case so that you can conveniently attach it when you want to use your handset for some serious photography.

Available for the iPhone 4/5 and Samsung Galaxy S3, the bluetooth controller works in unison with a dedicated iOS and Android app so you can take photos with the shutter button, choose from various shooting modes and zoom in/out. More specifically, the Snappgrip controller provides real shooting controls such as:

  • Shutter Function: Full press to take picture, half press to focus
  • Shooting Mode: Portrait, landscape, flash and video
  • Zoom Function: Zoom in for close ups or zoom out for wide shots

And additional features include:

  • An iPhone 4, iPhone 5 or Samsung Galaxy S3-specific case to which the Snappgrip controller is easily attached or removed
  • A tripod mounting point at the base of the controller
  • A power switch and a micro USB connector for easy recharging with any standard USB/micro-USB cable
  • An internal lithium ion battery that will last up to 60 hours on standby

Judging by the intro video and screenshots, the Snappgrip looks quite promising, especially if the idea of being able to comfortably hold your iPhone for everyday photography sounds enticing. Since this Kickstart campaign just went underway, there are still plenty of early bird specials available. For £19 (~$30US), you’ll get the full Snappgrip package, which includes the case and controller (there are only 100 of these pledges up for grabs). Once that’s gone, you can still secure yours for £29 (500 slots). The Snappgrip is expected to be released in February 2013 for around £69. There are still 39 days to go for the team to meet its goal of £18,000 in funding.

Check out the video below and head over to the Kickstart page for the complete details.

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Specifications

  • Works with: iPhone 4, iPhone 5 and Samsung Galaxy S3
  • App available for iOS and Android
  • Colours: Silver/Black, Silver/White/Brown, limited edition gold plated Kickstarter edition
  • Phone case with removable camera controller. Wriststrap loop.
  • App connectivity: Bluetooth
  • Tripod Mount: Universal 1/4” thread; compatible with all standard tripods
  • Power: micro USB for charging. ~60 hours standby.

Production & Launch

We have a beautiful working prototype and we’re encouraged by the feedback from people we speak to. This Kickstarter campaign is our opportunity to finesse the product before production and of course get that funding boost that can fast-track our production.

Once we’re funded we will be able to quickly manufacture the first snappgripbatch and ship them to our project backers. We are fortunate that we have good connections with proven manufacturing facilities in the far east allowing us to quickly manage production, QA and shipping without learning these processes along the way. If you check our team biography below you’ll see that we’ve been involved with consumer electronics design, manufacturing and distribution for a while so although the unexpected will always find ways to trip you up, if this funding programme is successful, we will be repeating processes that we’ve undertaken at other times in our careers.

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Gizmon iCa iPhone camera case in Review – Barnack would be proud http://www.touchmyapps.com/2012/04/18/gizmon-ica-iphone-camera-case-in-review-barnac-would-be-proud/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2012/04/18/gizmon-ica-iphone-camera-case-in-review-barnac-would-be-proud/#comments Wed, 18 Apr 2012 15:05:58 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=67615 Steve Jobs (RIP) may have publicly glibbed that the iPhone 4 was “like a beautiful old Leica camera”, but he never saw the Gizmon iCa coming… No one did. And I’m glad. Perfectly succinct designs, such as the iPhone and the iCa, are obvious only after debut. Why is that? As I sip diluted tea … Read more]]>

Steve Jobs (RIP) may have publicly glibbed that the iPhone 4 was “like a beautiful old Leica camera”, but he never saw the Gizmon iCa coming…

No one did. And I’m glad. Perfectly succinct designs, such as the iPhone and the iCa, are obvious only after debut. Why is that? As I sip diluted tea at my dining table and type, scenes from the past two weeks flood over me. These few weeks have seen me skipping, happy, snappy, and experimenting. I’ve found a love for digital photography. Finally.

The prices

  • GIZMON iCA (each color) $65.00
  • GIZMON iCA MILITARY $70.00
  • Fisheye Lens $55.00
  • iCA Pod Tripod $25.00

So it doesn’t come cheap. That it comes at all to the iPhone is an immense joy.

So what is iCa?

Yes, iCa protects the iPhone’s edges with well-moulded plastic. Yes, it puts a personal face onto the ubiquitous slab of silicon, aluminium, and glass. And yes, it starts with a small ‘i’. But it surely isn’t your run-of-the-mill plastic and graphic.

Oh yes, all those ‘yeses’ were in answer to the question I assumed each of you asked: is it a case?

So, it’s a camera?
But let’s forget about that for a moment. The iCa’s iconic exterior isn’t just for show. It’s feature-packed. There’s a wide-angle viewfinder, an easy-to-press shutter button, camera strap loops, a detachable tripod mount, and a real lens mount. Sounds like a camera, doesn’t it? I think of it as one. Currently, Gizmon have only two lenses for their camera -errr… iPhone: a circular fisheye, and a close-up lens. But couple those with the iPhone’s ~28mm 135 format equivalent lens, and you’ve got quite a powerful and fun camera system. That said, I’ve only got the fisheye to test.

At least it’s fun.

It’s nothing more than a magnifying glass tuned for distance focusing, so don’t expect Nikkor optics. Instead, expect fun, crazy vantages, close-ups, a 180º world view; in short, expect great pictures in that bloated, extended, fisheye perspective.

Both the fisheye and close up lens mount into the iCa case via magnetic backs. If you don’t have the case, each comes with mounting hardware for all but the original iPhone. But with a little sticky tack and some luck, you can attach either to your iPod touch, original iPhone, or iPad.

Photographers know that fisheye lenses can get big, heavy, and scratched. Gizmon have combatted each of these issues. Well, maybe Apple started it. The tiny photo sensor in the iPhone is perfect for fisheye photography because an iPhone lens can be the size of a thimble and still produce great images. Of course, resolving all those tiny (and numerous) pixels is tough work, especially for a 60$ optic. But I don’t think work was Gizmon’s aim.

Framing
Half of what I love about the iCa, however, is tied into the viewfinder and realistic shutter button. Attaching lenses for close up and fisheye work means you HAVE to frame your shots like you do with a point-and-shoot digital camera. Just like digital and film cameras that sport tiny viewfinders, you’ll have to be aware of parallax errors. Objects in the distance frame nicely, but the closer you get to them, the more the discrepancy between what the lens sees and what your eye sees grows.

Still, the iCa viewfinder is the bee’s knees.

It’s all about portability
Even packed with accessory lenses and the viewfinder hump, the iCa/iPhone combination remains small and out-of-sight. The fisheye lens disappears in the hand. In its most compact form (with the feaux pancake lens attached), the iCa even slides into skinny-fit jeans.

What encouraged me to whip out the iPhone and shoot is the same wide-angle viewfinder that I blubbered on about above. It’s not a toy. I’ve never gotten used to shooting at arm’s length, staring into dim, reflective LCD’s. The two cameras I use most often, a pristine Canon P, and a well-loved Olympus Trip 35 (stolen from my father-in-law), are natural cameras that keep you focused on your subject, not on a screen, or a menu, or a software shutter button.

The iCa transforms the iPhone into the easier to use of the two: the Olympus Trip. Well, as an iPhone, it does a lot more than the Trip does. The Olympus Trip has two only shutter speeds, requires film, doesn’t focus for you and doesn’t automatically do instragram.

A street camera in disguise
Just like the GoDAP transforms your iPhone into a HiFi listening device, the iCa transforms your iPhone into a street camera. The process, which involves twisting two parts, sliding two others, and snapping one into place, takes about a minute; and, as you snap it all together, the realisation deepens that the iCa ain’t just looks.

No. With a flick of the camera icon on your lock screen, your iPhone disappears. Bring it up to your eye, frame a shot, and press the shutter release. You have your shot in as natural a pose as is possible for a camera. (Yep, that button on the top that looks like a shutter release _is_ a shutter release. The others: film rewind knob, film advance knob, shutter speed dial, etc. are just for show.)

And what a show it is.

Snap-shooting around Akihabara, I practically forgot that I was shooting with a phone. It’s probably because I carry it in two hands like a camera, and squint into the finder like I do into a real camera. While for some, using the iPhone like this may seem quaint, for me, it is freeing.

Since the lenses are so small, changing them in ‘the field’ is easy as pie. (When not in use I deposited the fisheye in my trouser pocket as really who needs a belt or camera bag to stow a thimble?)

   
   

A few tough realities
The iCa isn’t without it’s faults, though. Believe it or not, raising the iPhone to your eye will draw eyes more than holding it out at your elbows. Why, i have no idea. Then of course, the shutter lag that ever plagues the iPhone is still present. The iCa is a boon to iPhone looks and operations. It does’t fix problems inherent in the iPhone camera hardware. Then, there are the tiny camera eye loops. You need cat nipple milking gloves and a watch maker’s dissection kit to attach them. Extreme myopia also helps. Even if you get the iCa attached to a camera strap, you have to get it into your head that your 500$ iPhone is hanging from a bit of plastic. One drop and it’s all over.

The included tripod mount is cute. It doesn’t lock into place. It works, but again, don’t expect it to keep your iPhone safe in wind or even moderate angles. Trust me, with even a little stress, your iPhone will fall. Unless you glue the mount to your iPhone and sandbag the tripod you’ll never be 100% safe.

And of course, just like a rangefinder, for close-up photography, you’ve got to deal with parallax, but even more so as the lens and viewfinder are on exact opposite sides of the camera. Oh well, I think it’s a small price to pay.

The only other problem with the iCa involves texting. It may look like a Leica III, but you can text on it. If you want to be cool on the train or in that camera circle, you’re only cool till you start texting on your Leica. Any camera geek knows that a circa 1935 camera probably didn’t sport a touchscreen keyboard. (Probably metal, antennas, a bunch of glass bubbles, and a whirling radar dish. Then again, I wasn’t alive in 1935, so I can’t be sure of what sort of texting outfits they had then).

But to get back to modern-day texting, the iCa impedes progress. You HAVE to go two hands unless your fingers are as thin as bendable as Twizzlers. The iCa is so much bigger than the regular iPhone. But then again, you knew that didn’t you? You want the viewfinder, better shooting ergonomics, lens mount, and the promise of more to come.

You don’t care about texting. Not really.

Conclusion
Gizmon’s iCa is the most innovative iPhone photography accessory I’ve come across. Its looks put on a show, sure, but in hand, it transforms your clunky iPhone into a classical viewfinder-toting camera. No more squinting against the sun, or hiding from glare, no more shaky shaky from outstretched arms. It’s all there, even in sometimes awful parallax glory, but in a world where digital cropping can fix any framing defect, iCa is king.

Kiss It Rating - 5/5

Gizmon iCa Summary
Earphone: GIZMON iCA Maker: GIZMON
Price: $65-70 USD
  • Looks like a Leica III
  • Shoot like a real camera
  • Comfortable and solid in the hand
  • Real lens mount
  • Accessories galore
  • Natural grip blocks iPhone camera
  • Not the best protection for iPhone
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SlingShot gives your iPhone better video stabilization for under $20 http://www.touchmyapps.com/2012/04/09/slingshot-gives-your-iphone-better-video-stabilization-for-under-20/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2012/04/09/slingshot-gives-your-iphone-better-video-stabilization-for-under-20/#comments Mon, 09 Apr 2012 15:49:15 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=67532 Fancy yourself as an i-videographer? Well, this Kickstarter project should go on your list of must-have accessories while shooting those critical scenes. Created by professional photographer and design engineer Charles Waugh, the SlingShot’s a video stabilization gizmo that not only works with the iPhone, but a whole range of smartphones as well. Made with industrial grade acetal resin, the … Read more]]>

Fancy yourself as an i-videographer? Well, this Kickstarter project should go on your list of must-have accessories while shooting those critical scenes. Created by professional photographer and design engineer Charles Waugh, the SlingShot’s a video stabilization gizmo that not only works with the iPhone, but a whole range of smartphones as well. Made with industrial grade acetal resin, the unique cradle can stretch out and securely grip even the Samsung Galaxy Note (a whooping 5.3″ screen). A ball-mount lets you swivel your device and the handle hides a set of legs that’ll turn it into a handy table-top tripod (the cradle can also be removed and mounted onto any standard tripod).

The project has currently reached nearly $10,000 of its of goal of $20,000, with 41 days to go. A pledge of only $14 and you’ll receive the SlingShot with free shipping in the US (international orders add $10). Check out the video and production description below.

Description

It’s about time that someone creates a great little camera stabilizer accessory for all smartphones that is actually affordable. WOXOM has already engineered and produced the first sample round of its great little SlingShot smartphone video stabilizer and just introduced it on Kickstarter.com to raise capital for a retail launch later this year.

With HD image resolution now a smartphone norm, the SlingShot transforms the way smartphones are used for capturing video by helping to make the camera movement as high quality as the image itself. The SlingShot rivals the image stability of semi-professional stabilizer systems costing many, many times more.

  • Shoot smooth video and tack-sharp stills on any smartphone with one hand
  • Use as an instant table-top tripod to stabilize any smartphone
  • Mount any smartphone on a standard tripod

Made from an industrial-grade acetal copolymer
Slingshot easily expands to hold any smartphone, even with a case. The cradle is tailored to the iPhone, but it also works with any other smartphone — even up to the hulking Samsung Galaxy Note.

Over-molded rubber pads give it just the right amount of grip
Even upside-down it holds any smartphone securely. It also allows power cords to connect to the cradled phone so watching a movie doesn’t drain the battery.

The contoured handle hides a concealed set of legs
Legs pop out and turn the handheld stabilizer into a table-top tripod – great for shooting video or stills and useful for reviewing your videos, watching a movie, Facetime, using Skype, or just browsing the web.

Universal smartphone support for use on all tripods
Since the phone cradle is attached to the handle with a 1/4-20 thread, it can also mount onto any standard tripod or support base.

[Kickstarter] … Read more]]>
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Photojojo iPhone SLR Mount turns your iPhone into Nikon or Canon mirrorless camera http://www.touchmyapps.com/2011/07/07/photojojo-iphone-slr-mount-turns-your-iphone-into-nikon-or-canon-mirrorless-camera/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2011/07/07/photojojo-iphone-slr-mount-turns-your-iphone-into-nikon-or-canon-mirrorless-camera/#comments Fri, 08 Jul 2011 02:14:01 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=54607 Photojojo’s new iPhone SLR Mount may just turn  your iPhone into the elusive (and rumoured) Canon/Nikon mirrorless camera system. It is a case, threaded filter ring, extension tube with aperture coupling and included Nikon or Canon mount. It is fair to guess that since the lenses share no electronic coupling with the iPhone itself, you’ll have to … Read more]]>

Photojojo’s new iPhone SLR Mount may just turn  your iPhone into the elusive (and rumoured) Canon/Nikon mirrorless camera system. It is a case, threaded filter ring, extension tube with aperture coupling and included Nikon or Canon mount. It is fair to guess that since the lenses share no electronic coupling with the iPhone itself, you’ll have to meter, guess at apertures, and experiment like the very oldest of days. Thankfully, you’ll have at least 8GB of space to do it with as the iPhone SLR Mount works with the iPhone 3G/3GS or iPhone 4. A tripod mount fits the butt of your iPhone 4 or iPhone 3G/3GS, but the weight of the entire unit with a lens might be a stretch for the Turtle Back (the threaded mount) unless you use a Voigtlander pancake.

Hit the gap for more from Photojojo.

The mounts themselves are pretty dear, weighing in at 249,00$ for the iPhone 4 mount and 190,00$ for the iPhone 3G/3GS mount.

Which is cool if you’re an avid iPhoneographer that just has to attach your bulky SLR lenses to your iPhone. Photojojo tout manual controls and depth of focus as two endearing features of the SLR mount. I don’t blame them. Your electronic zooms will be as manual as the beautiful old Nikkors that still had depth of focus scales carved into their frames. It looks as if aperture adjustment can be done on the barrel for electronic lenses. As for depth of field, that tiny sensor in the iPhone should crop everything but the hazy bits right out at any aperture.

I’m not sure whether this is practical or not, but it sure is cool. Photojojo haven’t released hi-res JPEGs taken from the iPhone. I think we can all expect these glass adapters to perform well well below their SLR equivalents, but that isn’t the issue. I mean, you can attach you old Nikkor 28mm AiS lens to your freaking iPhone, not to mention all the third party lenses designed for Canon and Nikon mounts. Practical? Pshaaaw, who knows. Cool? Hell yes.

Photo sites are up in arms, panning everything scientifically, calling potential buyers ‘hipsters’; iPhone rumour sites are up in arms to show off their photography know how. And no one anywhere has the device to actually use. I’d say the iPhone SLR Mount is as polarising as Sigma’s SD1 announcement and subsequent 4x price rise.

From Photojojo’s website:

Ever since the iPhone camera was invented, it’s aspired to be what it simply never quite could be: a DSLR. Sure, apps have helped your camera phone inch forward with simulated focusing and faux filters.

Faux no more. The iPhone SLR Mount gives you the real thing. It’ll set your phone photos apart from everyone else’s on Instagram in an unprecedented way (#nofilter)!

This case-adapter combo lets you mount your Canon EOS or Nikon SLR lenses to your iPhone 4 giving your phone powerful depth of field and manual focus.

Telephoto, wide angle, macro, or your fixed-fifty lenses all attach to this mount giving you a full range of lenses at your iPhone lovin’ fingertips. Heck, you could even throw on a Diana adapter!

Plus, you’ll be putting the SLR lenses you already have to use with the camera you always have with you — your phone.

Two loopholes on each end of the case let you tie on a camera strap, so you can hang it around your neck just like your real DSLR.

Now that your favorite camera has it all, what’re you going to do with your DSLR?

Want to go straight to the iPhone SLR Mount photos page? Click here.

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blueSLR Wireless Camera Control in Review – Gotta have it iDevice camera trigger http://www.touchmyapps.com/2011/02/03/blueslr-wireless-camera-control-in-review/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2011/02/03/blueslr-wireless-camera-control-in-review/#comments Fri, 04 Feb 2011 05:44:08 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=47620 While certain Canadian icons such as RIM and maple syrup slide in popularity, Sonomax’s unique custom earphone, and XEquals’ BlueSLR, a gotta-have-it dongle that turns your iPod touch/iPad/iPhone into a remote shutter release for your camera, are hoisting the Canadian flag to new technological heights. For me, the latter rocks simple reason that: I always … Read more]]>

While certain Canadian icons such as RIM and maple syrup slide in popularity, Sonomax’s unique custom earphone, and XEquals’ BlueSLR, a gotta-have-it dongle that turns your iPod touch/iPad/iPhone into a remote shutter release for your camera, are hoisting the Canadian flag to new technological heights. For me, the latter rocks simple reason that: I always have my iPod touch with me, and that I’ve been looking for an integrated wireless shutter release for my camera for a long time. Considering that the BlueSLR also does GPS and a host of other things, I think that many photographers will agree that this is a revolutionary product.

Features:
-remote shutter release
-autofocus
-manual control of shutter delay and actuation count
-GPS pass-through
-up to 100 metre working distance
-works with all iDevices from 2nd gen on

Build Quality
This 149$ dongle isn’t bulletproof, but it’s made to accept the rigours of use. Its 10-pin Nikon D200+ mount fits solidly into its coupling unit and is zigg-zagged with ample stress reliefs. Since nothing else hangs off the dongle, there is very little stress put on at the neck or the coupler. I expect the BlueSLR to take drops, tosses, and backpack-mashing with style. But, it isn’t water proof, nor does it like to be pried apart. Treat it like you treat your camera, and it will last a long time.

BlueSLR’s design has one somewhat serious drawback, however. The 10-pin wireless release port on Nikon cameras is threaded much like the front of your lens is. Unfortunately, the BlueSLR mount isn’t threaded. It is pressed into place. While not unstable, it could to the ground during use. A twist-mount would be a great addition in future BlueSLR models. Adding to that, it sits in a semi-awkward place, blocking the input/output doors of the camera, and precluding the use of mounting the camera in portrait orientation with certain tripod mounts.

There are smaller, more robust bluetooth units out there, but they both cost a lot more and require the use of an extra trigger. The reason the BlueSLR is amazing is that it uses your already much-used iDevice to trigger your camera. In my case, my iPad always sits in my camera bag. It offloads pictures from my card, sorts my photos, and in the odd case that I have internet connection, post processes and uploads photos to my flickr account. (Items tagged BlueSLR are taken with the BlueSLR module.)

Expanding the usefulness of what has become the second most used gadget in my camera bag is wonderful. Of course, I can re-sync my iPod touch with the BlueSLR for even more portable/discreet use. Considering, too, that there are amazing cases and accessories that both protect your iDevice and expand its usefulness, the BlueSLR/iDevice combination is one of the most robust accessory packs in the wild.

The App
BlueSLR is free at the App Store, but does nothing without the dongle. That, of course, is your 149$ responsibility. Its most basic function is to remotely control your camera’s shutter. You get full control over GPS accuracy, update speed, autofocus, and a handful of shutter options.

To get it working, you have to enable Bluetooth and location services from the settings menu. In previous builds, achieving good connection took some work and more than a little prayer. Since version 1,1-1,2, connection has been easier to achieve, and from version 1,3, achieving connection is sure and quick.

The GPS portion of BlueSLR simply feeds information from your iPhone/iPad/iPod touch, to your camera, so as long as you are connected to a network, your pictures will be GPS tagged and timestamped. In Korea, foreigners aren’t allowed to sign up for smartphone contracts, so the only time I’ve been able to use the GPS portion of the BlueSLR is when I’m in cafes that have free internet. Even my home rejects the use of iDevices. In any case, BlueSLR will feed timestamp and GPS information to your camera and print that information into the exinfo of each photo.

BlueSLR has received a number of visual tweaks. As mentioned before, connection issues have been addressed. The working distance is an incredible 100 metres. I’ve used a number of Bluetooth devices over the years and one thing that sticks in my mind when the word Bluetooth is mentioned is ‘weak’. Even with my favourite Cy-Fi Wireless Sports Speaker, the working distance is only up to 8 metres, but often, connection is cut at much less than that. The BlueSLR really achieves miracles. In crowded areas, I can achieve wireless connectivity at up to 80 metres in a straight line.

The thing to look out for is lag. There is a minimum delay of 200ms from the time you press the virtual shutter release on your iDevice till the camera fires. In other words, while you can shoot burst photos, you won’t be able to fire immediately. I don’t know if this can be addressed with future versions of the hardware, or software.

Another thing to look out for is battery life. With all the bells and whistles enabled, BlueSLR really drains the battery of your device. My iPod touch loses about 20% after just about 10 minutes of use, maybe less. I can get a lot of photos fired off in that time, but much less than I wold hope. Turning off GPS from the app helps, but then, it also limits some of the best functionality of the BlueSLR itself.

On the camera, the battery drain isn’t as severe, but it is noticeable. Of course, the D200 is a noted battery hog, so the difference between 300-400 RAW shots and 200-300 RAW shots per charge isn’t that noticeable. It’s something to keep in mind though.

I hope that in later iterations of the hardware or software, location services can be set to off as I would like to use more and worry less about battery.

Why is BlueSLR good?
If you religiously read TouchMyApps, you probably have an iDevice of some sort. if that device is anything but the very first generation of iPod touch or iPhone, you’ll be able to use BlueSLR with your camera. It is the perfect companion to photographer that subscribes to Apple’s marketing brainwash.

Think of the possibilities.

Stacked photography, fixed-angle sports shots, remotely trigger flashes, remote nature observation and photography, HDR (note: bracketing has to be set manually, from the camera), family “let me just set the timer, hunn” shots, and many more.

As mentioned before, there is a minimum 200ms delay. That will limit the usefulness of this app to control remote cameras for flash triggering, especially at sporting events where timing is essential. But apart from that, and the ability to trigger more than one device at a time, the imagination is the limit.

You can also wirelessly autofocus, so as long as you’ve got the camera pointed in the right direction, and aren’t training on fast-moving objects, you can set your camera to take incredible staged shots. I’ve been using the BlueSLR to trigger remote flashes, for stacked photography, for snooping, and for HDR tripod shots.

Again, the working distance is stated as 100 metres, which I think is a good, best-case scenario. If you live in a city where people carry one phone for every lover they have, you’ll get less. Again in Seoul, I get about 80 metres line of site working distance. At home, that distance drops as I the signal has to travel through doors and walls, but remains respectable. I’ve had my camera firing through three doors before I had to reconnect. BlueSLR hasn’t conquered my steel front door, though, and even if it did, I’d be more worried that my ‘steel’ door is another lie that EG The 1 (Cr)Apartments have laid on us.

Points to Ponder

GPS
If you are in love with the GPS functions of BlueSLR, you’ll have to be careful. As soon as you lose connection because of dead battery, or distance, or software instability, you lose GPS functionality. You can use your camera as you usually would when plugged into the BlueSLR and app. Make sure the two are connected, and then raise the camera to your eye and shoot. GPS information will be embedded into your files. Yay.

Pairing
Funnily enough, I’ve gotten the BlueSLR to pair with my iPad while really wanting to use my iPod touch. The reason is that Bluetooth was turned off in my iPod touch general settings, but on in my iPad. The result? I hijacked my camera. Bluetooth is rudimentary enough to allow only one device to connect at a time, but if that device isn’t switched on, and in the case of another compatible device being around, your BlueSLR and camera, could be hijacked. Of course, another photographer would have to have the BlueSLR app handy to hijack your camera, a feat I don’t think likely.

Conclusion
Overall, BlueSLR is the perfect companion for the iDevice-toting photographer. If you don’t have an iDevice, don’t rush out to get one and the BlueSLR – it sort of cuts out the cost advantages of the system. Currently, there is no cheaper way to fire your camera via Bluetooth and no better way to sync it than with an iDevice. Pass-through GPS information is an added, and exciting bonus to the BlueSLR that easily makes it worth the price of entry.

149$ sounds like a lot on paper, but after utilising the GPS, remote firing, and triggering functions of the BlueSLR, it is a pittance. XEquals – if you can bump battery life and secure the BlueSLR with a threaded mount, you’ll have a perfect accessory for the iDevice-toting photographer.

App Summary
Title: blueSLR Developer: XEquals
Reviewed Ver: 1.3 Min OS Req: OS 3.1.3 or later
Price: FREE (app) 149$ (blueSLR dongle) App Size: 2.2 MB
  • GPS pass-thru
  • Great wireless range
  • good build quality
  • opens doors for extreme creativity
  • possible wireless security
  • battery drain

appstoreicon

Acc-XEquals-BlueSLR-01 Acc-XEquals-BlueSLR-02 Acc-XEquals-BlueSLR-03 Acc-XEquals-BlueSLR-04 Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-blue-d200 Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-box Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-D200-piggy-01 Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-D200-piggy-02 Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-glam-01 Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-manual Acc-Xequals-BlueSLR-nakamiRead more]]>
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Apple’s Camera Connection Kit – Slappy! http://www.touchmyapps.com/2010/05/25/apple%e2%80%99s-camera-connection-kit-slappy/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2010/05/25/apple%e2%80%99s-camera-connection-kit-slappy/#comments Tue, 25 May 2010 08:46:50 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=33407 Our friends over at AppSlappy – THE best podcast about all things iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch (trust me on that – I tried dozens) – have just posted an excellent video review of Apple’s Camera Connection Kit. I don’t know about you, but once I get an iPad – that’s one of the first … Read more]]>

Our friends over at AppSlappy – THE best podcast about all things iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch (trust me on that – I tried dozens) – have just posted an excellent video review of Apple’s Camera Connection Kit. I don’t know about you, but once I get an iPad – that’s one of the first things on my list to buy as an accessory. Slappy!

[via AppSlappy] … Read more]]>
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iZoom – 8X optical power for snipers and peeping Toms http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/11/20/izoom-8x-optical-power-for-snipers-and-peeping-toms/ http://www.touchmyapps.com/2009/11/20/izoom-8x-optical-power-for-snipers-and-peeping-toms/#comments Fri, 20 Nov 2009 14:54:18 +0000 http://www.touchmyapps.com/?p=23490 Princeton, the web-store responsible for the off-kilter “Invitation to the Innovations” slogan, have a beautiful piece of glass for the iPhone. The iZoom provides 8X optical zoom lens, a tripod, and a screw-in lens mount for the iPhone 3G and 3GS. And, according the the spec, this cheap attachment shoots at F1.1 speed for out-of-focus … Read more]]>

Accessory-Princeton-iPhoneZoom

Princeton, the web-store responsible for the off-kilter “Invitation to the Innovations” slogan, have a beautiful piece of glass for the iPhone. The iZoom provides 8X optical zoom lens, a tripod, and a screw-in lens mount for the iPhone 3G and 3GS. And, according the the spec, this cheap attachment shoots at F1.1 speed for out-of-focus blurring. For the artistic sniper, this ~45$ attachment may mean the difference between simple head shots and sexy glamour shots. For peeping Toms… well, this lens should do the trick.

Accessory-Princeton-iPhoneZoom-01

Accessory-Princeton-iPhoneZoom-02

The iZoom is scheduled for an early December release with the above specifications and a ~45$ price tag.

PIP-CK1 iZoom

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