Cargo-Bot, first iOS game developed entirely on iPad

On the surface, Two Lives Left’s Cargo-Bot looks like any other ordinary puzzle game, but beneath it all, it was created entirely on the iPad – making it the first iOS game programmed solely on an iOS device. Released earlier today, Cargo-Bot was made with Codea [$9.99], a touch-based programming app for the iPad.

Presenting Cargo-Bot. The first game programmed entirely on iPad using Codea™. Cargo-Bot is a puzzle game where you teach a robot how to move crates. Sounds simple, right?

It features 36 fiendishly clever puzzles, haunting music and stunning retina graphics. You can even record your solutions and share them on YouTube to show your friends.

Developed by Codea user Rui Viana and Two Lives Left over a four month period, Fred Bogg – a compose who created a music library for Codea – was brought in to create music for Cargo-Bot. Interestingly enough, Two Lives Left is also releasing the “Codea Runtime Library source code under the Apache License Version 2.0″, thus allowing registered Apple iOS developers to export their Codea projects so that they can be published as standalone apps on the App Store (previously, there was no way to export projects from Codea app).

Cargo-Bot is available now for free on the iPad, and well worth a look.

Cargo-Bot Two Lives Left, Cargo-Bot - Free

Video Demo of Codea:

Codea for iPad lets you create games and simulations — or just about any visual idea you have. Turn your thoughts into interactive creations that make use of iPad features like Multi-Touch and the accelerometer.

We think Codea is the most beautiful code editor you’ll use, and it’s easy. Codea is designed to let you touch your code. Want to change a number? Just tap and drag it. How about a color, or an image? Tapping will bring up visual editors that let you choose exactly what you want.

Codea is built on the Lua programming language. A simple, elegant language that doesn’t rely too much on symbols — a perfect match for iPad.

[9to5Mac]

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