Osfoora In Review – Big offerings from a little bird

They say that the only guaranteed things in life are death and taxes.  As an app reviewer, one thing I can definitely guarantee is that there is always ANOTHER Twitter app to review.  I had done my best to stay away from them as much as possible, however lately I’ve been in the mood for change and scrolling through the appstore I came across the oddly named Osfoora (translated: Little Bird). Read on to see what’s up with this strangely named little app.

If you’ve read my reviews (going back to day 1) you’ll know that I have been dedicated to 1 twitter client (tweeterena and the updated tweeterena pro).  Mostly because (a) its simple and (b) I loved the design.
Osfoora takes everything I love and want in a Twitter client and makes it look so clean and professional.  Your front/main screen is a collection of expertly created icons that link to all of the features you could ever need in a portable client (including latest additions like “lists”).  After that, each screen is eye candy.

Function wise, you can go just about anywhere from the home screen.  However, most of you will probably want to tap the “Timeline” button in the top left.  This brings you to the main interface of the app with regards to reading your tweets.  Along the bottom you have links to the usual areas (main/public timeline, @ mentions, messages, search and more). This is enough to give you what you’ll usually want, without overcrowding.

Whenever you have new messages that need reading you’ll see the bubble on top of the tab at the bottom and your screen will scroll to the oldest new tweet so that you just scroll down to read the rest. I really like how well it works, no lag or stutters.  When viewing from the main “Time Line” any @ mentions are highlighted a different colour for easy distinguishing. To update any of the timelines just drag the feed down to reveal the toolbar and refresh.

Tweeting yourself is just a matter of tapping the button on the top right and spilling your guts (in 140 characters or less of course). Here some people may be a little intimidated as there are a handful of tiny icons above your keyboard that represent everything from geotagging to image posting. It takes a bit of getting used to but after awhile I found it easier to work with.

One of the main things that really brought me to Osfoora was how much of the latest Twitter offerings it takes advantage of.  Things like the newer “ReTweet” option is offered, as well as the older “RT with quoted text” style.  They also display those new ReTweets with 2 icons showing who posted and who retweeted.  Very cool feature in my opinion.

Another great innovation that I wanted to touch on, is the automatic preview of Twitpic images, and the seamless integration of Twitvid movies.  Both run so smooth that if you didn’t know of the services you would think they were built right into the app.

There are tons of settings available to you. Everything from theme/customizations to selecting automatic image or url shortening services.  Rather than triple the length of this review I highly recommend you check the list of almost 40 features built into the app (and they aren’t even all of them).

Among the hundreds of various Twitter apps at the App Store, Osfoora strikes an excellent balance of features that I’m sure will leave even the heaviest of users satisfied. If you’re looking for a new Twitter client that is both visually appealing without getting cheesy, as well as stable and loaded with useful functions. Then I think Osfoora is definitely the app for you.

App Summary
Title: Osfoora for TwitterDeveloper: Said M. Marouf
Reviewed Ver:1.2.0.3Min OS Req:3.1
Price:$2.99App Size:2.1 MB
  • Great design
  • Loads of features
  • Makes good use of new Twitter features
  • Excellent price
  • Icons on tweet screen may confuse some users
  • Lacks a “help” page with all features explained

appstoreicon

Social Networking apps help keep you on track and strapped into the Matrix – get yours today!

Next ArticleComets and Craters in Review – The first step away from classic TD